Training Facilities and Faculty

Training Facilities and Faculty

The strength of any training program lies in the training faculty, who are primarily responsible for nurturing trainees and providing them a state-of-the-art research environment in which to pursue their training. The efforts of the training faculty in this regard are augmented by the Departments, Colleges and University, which provide core facilities covering a broad range of techniques and services. The faculty and these core facilities are described here.

Name/degree

Rank

Appointment

Research interest

Role, % effort

Cardiovascular development

Allen, Ronald, Ph.D.

Professor

Animal and Comparitive Biomedical Sciences

Muscle-derived stem cells, muscle repair and angiogenesis

Mentor, 5%

Antin, Parker, Ph.D.

Professor

Cellular & Molecular Medicine

Regulation of cardiac muscle development

Mentor, 5%

Camenisch, Todd, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Pharmacology/Tox

Signaling in cardiovascular development

Mentor, 5%

Doetschman, Tom Ph.D.

Professor

Cellular & Molecular Medicine

Signaling in Cardiovascular development and disease

Mentor, 5%

Granzier, Henk Ph.D.

Professor

Cellular & Molecular Medicine

Cytoskeletal protein interactions in development, function and diseases of cardiac and smooth muscles

Mentor, 5%

Gregorio, Carol, Ph.D.

Professor

Cellular & Molecular Mediicine

Cytoskeletal protein interactions during development of striated muscle

Mentor, 5%

Klewer, Scott, M.D.

Professor

Pediatrics

Signaling in  heart valve development

Mentor, 5%

Krieg, Paul, Ph.D.

Professor

Cellular & Molecular Medicine

Organogenesis; development of heart and blood vessels

Mentor, 5%

Runyan, Raymond, Ph.D.

Professor

Cellular & Molecular Medicine

Mechanisms of cellular transformation in the developing heart

Mentor, 5%

Simon, Alexander, Ph.D.

Professor

Physiology

Roles of gap junctions in development of the heart and vasculature

Mentor, 5%

Vaillancourt, Richard, Ph.D.

Assoiate Professor

Pharmacology/Tox

Protein kinase activity and regulation

Mentor, 5%

Tissue homeostasis

Boitano, Scott, Ph.D.

Professor

Physiology

Barrier function of the airway epithelium in infection – inflammation and signaling

Mentor, 5%

Burt, Janis, Ph.D.

Professor

Physiology

Roles of gap junctions in coordinated function of the heart and vasculature

Prog. Director,
Mentor, 15%

Dantzler, William, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor, Emeritus

Physiology

Organic anion and cation transport in the renal proximal tubule

Co-Mentor, 3%

Davis, Thomas, Ph.D.

Professor

Pharmacology

Blood-brain barrier function in ischemia and inflammatory disease

Mentor, 5%

Delamere, Nicholas, Ph.D.

Professor

Physiology (Chair of)

Na,K-ATPase and connexins in homeostasis of the eye

Mentor, 5%

Miranda, Katrina Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Chemistry & Biochemistry

Nitric oxide signaling in disease; pharmacologic therapy

Mentor, 5%

Montfort, William, Ph.D.

Professor

Biochem Mol. Biophys.

Structure-function studies of nitric oxide and its signaling proteins

Mentor, 5%

Regan, John Ph.D.

Professor

Pharm. & Tox

Prostaglandins in inflammation and disease

Co-Mentor, 3%

Secomb, Timothy, Ph.D.

Professor

Physiology

Microcirculatory function, theoretical models

Prog. Co-Director, Mentor, 10%

Stamer, Daniel, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Ophthalmo­logy

Regulation of aqueous humor flow, barrier function, aquaporins, signaling

Mentor, 5%

Wright, Stephen, Ph.D.

Professor

Physiology

Organic anion and cation transport in the renal proximal tubule

Mentor, 5%

Cardiovascular disease

Brooks, Heddwen, Ph.D.

Professor

Physiology

Sex differences in T cell mediated hypertension, role of estrogen in development of postmenopausal hypertension

Co-Mentor, 3%

Chen, Qin, Ph.D.

Professor

Pharmacology

Mechanisms of Oxidative injury and adaptation; Stress signal transduction Mentor 5%

Goldman, Steven, M.D.

Professor

Medicine

Vascular biology and heart failure

Mentor, 5%

Henriksen, Erik, Ph.D.

Professor,

Emeritus

Physiology

Regulation of glucose transport in diabetes and oxidative stress

Mentor, 5%

Larson, Douglas, Ph.D.

Professor

Surgery

Cardiomyopathies: Impact of the Immune system on LV function

Mentor, 5%

Linstedt, Stan, Ph.D.

Professor

Biology, NAU

Efficacy of eccentric exercise in post-surgical and heart failure patients

Co-Mentor, 3%

Lynch, Ron, Ph.D.

Professor

Physiology

Cellular mechanisms of diabetes

Mentor, 5%

McDonagh, Paul, Ph.D.

Professor, Emeritus

Surgery

Inflammation, ischemia/reperfusion in the heart

Mentor, 5%

Ritter, Leslie, Ph.D.

Professor

Nursing

Inflammation, ischemia-reperfusion and stroke

Co-Mentor, 3%

Joining the faculty

Shaowen Bao, PhD, Associate Professor

Meredith Hay, PhD, Professor
John Konhilas, Ph.D., Associate Prof., Physiology
Ayako Makino, PhD, Associate Professor
Sean Limesand, Ph.D., Professor, Animal Sciences

Facilities

The training faculty reside in ~40,000 square feet of space provided through thirteen departments of the University of Arizona (UA), Northern Arizona University (NAU) and the Veterans Administration Facilities in Tucson. The technical expertise and equipment available through individual labs is augmented by multiple facilities that provide core services to university faculty, staff and students, essentially free of charge. These services include:
Animal Imaging Resources (integrated access to state-of-the-art in vivo imaging based on magnetic resonance (MR), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), in vivo bioluminescence and optical coherence tomography (OCT));  Genetically Modified Mice Facility (design of molecular constructs for the development of transgenic mice, preparation of the transgenic mice containing those constructs, detection of the transgenic mice among live-born pups, consultation in the rearing and analysis of the mice);  Biotechnology Computing Facility (diverse tools and solutions for computational needs in Bioinformatics, Image Processing and Molecular Modeling);  Flow Cytometry Facility (fluorescence based flow cytometric analysis and cell sorting);  Biological Magnetic Resonance Facility (access to state-of-the-art Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) instrumentation for biomedical research);  Synthetic Chemistry Facility (designs, synthesizes radiolabeled and unlabeled compounds, purification and characterization of synthesized compounds);  Genomic Analysis & Technology Core (sequencing, mutation detection, microarray, real-time PCR, denaturing HPLC, bioinformatics);  Imaging Facility (all aspects of state-of-the-art light microscopy, electron microscopy, and image analysis including sample processing);  Proteomics Facility (+/- Electropsray Ionization (ESI) and Atmospheric Pressure Ionization (APCI) on TSQ-7000 and on LCQ, GC-MS, preparative and analytical HPLC, UV-Vis spectroscopy, 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis, Matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, a variety of proteomic procedures and protocols); Biometry Shared Service (provides expertise in biostatistics, clinical trials, epidemiology, applied mathematics, statistical computing, and database applications); Experimental Pathology Core (provides Histology Services (paraffin and frozen section histology, equipment for analysis and quantitation of radioactively labeled gels); cDNA Microarray Core (provides 5,700 human cDNA microarray slides, can fabricate custom gene microarray slides, and can perform the fluorescent labeling, hybridization, and scanning steps of the cDNA process).  

Additional Resources. The AHSC provides Grant Writing Support workshops and review services, maintains the Life Science (faculty and graduate program descriptions) and Faculty Research and Scholarship Databases, supports the Arizona Health Sciences Library and Biomedical Communications facilities, and houses the University Research Instrumentation Center.